Nvidia GeForce GTX 960. Видеокарта nvidia 960


GeForce GTX 960M vs GTX 1050

Showing 14 comments.

Faranox (07:03 PM, September 17, 2017)

If you are going for productivity, get a 960m, as its only about 25% slower, yet the price difference for a same spec'd system can be around $300, if not more. You can get a full spec (i7 7700HQ, 4k touch screen, 16gb ram, 960m) ($950) 960m system for the same price as a mil spec 1050 system (i5 7300HQ, 1080p, 8gb ram, 1050) ($950). Also last xmas microsoft had a deal for the max-spec 960 system (dell inspiron) for $650. It was the best deal ever on that site, and if it comes around again i recommend you get it.

houssem (10:58 PM, August 2, 2017)

if you are a gamer you should choose the gtx 1050 but if you aren't so interested by games keep in mind that gtx 960m has a good performance and great for the money also can run many of todays games with low -medium fps sometimes higher fps the game make the difference but in general its ok

houssem (10:58 PM, August 2, 2017)

if you are a gamer you should choose the gtx 1060 but if you aren't so interested by games keep in mind that gtx 960m has a good performance and great for the money also can run many of todays games with low -medium fps sometimes higher fps the game make the difference but in general its ok

houssem (10:52 PM, August 2, 2017)

in my opinion if you are so interested by games you have to choose the gtx 1060 but but if you are not keep in mind that gtx 960 m is good for the money and the performance its weaker than 1060 but but it still acceptable and can run all games of today with medium and low fps sometimes highter fps the game make the difference and with good resolution also

Bhagwan Singh (01:17 PM, June 5, 2017)

Keep in mind he 960M is MUCH weaker than the desktop 960.

Akhil Adiga (01:33 AM, May 3, 2017)

So which gpu is better for gaming 960 or 1050? which can i use for playing games in 1080p high settings?

Zakiy Ramadhan (06:43 AM, February 18, 2017)

oh you're indonesian. there's this amazing seller called Pemmz , you can check in tokopedia for MSI GL62M 7RD. The spec are: - i7-7700HQ - 8GB DDR4-2133 - 1TB SATA HDD (+ 1 M.2 NVMe slot PCI Gen.3) - Nvidia GTX1050 2GB GDDR5 - 15,6" FHD for the price of Rp 12.999.000. I think it's a steal since MSI GL62 6QF - 1481ID with i7-6700HQ and 960M is sold for the same price! Cheaper alternative is ASUS X550IU with FX processor and AMD RX460 with the price tag: Rp 9.999.000

Accel (01:24 AM, February 5, 2017)

Wait, maybe if I sell my old laptop, I could got that one... But I don't think it would sell well...

Accel (01:24 AM, February 5, 2017)

well, you may be right, I should get patience for it, thanks... for now I stuck with GT635M, well just deal with it...

Bhagwan Singh (11:43 PM, February 4, 2017)

150-200? More? Well then i really hope you save up a bit more. Seriously, go to youtube and compare the perfamnce of 960M (this is weaker than the desktop 960) to the 1060. If you literally have 0 patience, 1050 is the best choice. 960M is showing its age.

Accel (10:44 PM, February 4, 2017)

hmmm, I'm in Indonesia, and I think that for 1060 laptop's price is about $150 - $200 more expensive, but I know yes that 1060 is extremely better, but my budget is around for 960 or 1050

Bhagwan Singh (02:39 PM, February 4, 2017)

I would say so. But can you spare some extra money for a GTX 1060 laptop? It is just insanely more powerful than both of these cards. Of course, it's also a bit more expensive. Sometimes twice as expensive.

Accel (10:43 AM, February 4, 2017)

then, do you think 1050 is better? I kinda stuck for purchasing a gaming laptop

Bhagwan Singh (06:15 PM, January 28, 2017)

Man, I remember when 960M was almost guaranteed to be in every mid range gaming laptop. That time is over. 1050 is a very promising "low" end laptop graphics card for gamers. Nvidia did a great step up with removing the "M" in the name and sticking the full desktop cards in there. GG.

gpuboss.com

Nvidia GTX 960 review | Digital Trends

The number 60 has developed a special meaning in Nvidia’s product line over the last five years. While its high-end flagships push the boundaries of performance, its mid-range GPUs, like the much-loved GTX 660, are the chips most gamers actually buy. It’s currently the most popular family of video cards in Steam’s hardware survey, and the card most frequently used by fans of the multiplayer-online-battle-arena (MOBA) genre.

Yet it’s been awhile since we’ve seen an update. GTX 760 reviews hit the web in June of 2013, over a year and a half ago, with the card shipping in volume over the following month. Gamers have waited, and waited, and waited for a successor. Now, with the GTX 960, it’s finally here.

The GTX 960 is about 40 percent slower than the 980, but well less than half the price.

What Nvidia hopes to accomplish with this card is clear: The GTX 960 is built to be everything an average gamer will need. It may not run every game at the absolute highest settings, but it should handle most games at 1080p and a step off maximum detail – in theory, at least.

The formula of affordable performance has been Nvidia’s key to success in the past, but it’s never been easy to implement. Balancing speed, price and efficiency is tricky, and even a minor flub can send a card like this into the abyss of missed expectations.

Midsized Maxwell

The GTX 960 uses the same Maxwell architecture as the GTX 980 and 970 but, as you might expect, it’s been altered to craft a GPU that better suites the 960’s mission.

Nvidia calls the chip “GM206.” It has eight streaming multiprocessors, each of which contains 128 CUDA cores, for a total of 1,024. That’s roughly half the GTX 980, which provides a good idea of where this new card stands compared to the flagship. The GTX 960 is not just a minor step-down from the cream of the crop, but instead a dramatic revision that cuts back in several key areas.

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

Still, Nvidia says it has extracted maximum grunt from the cores available. Per-core performance is up almost 40 percent compared to Kepler, the architecture used in the 700 series chips, and performance per watt has doubled.

Few gamers will have reason to quarrel with the GPU. They may have a complaint about the memory, however, which is a meager 128-bit pipe paired with 2GB of GDDR5.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 Compared To

That works out to 148.8 gigabytes of bandwidth per second, which is about 100 gigabytes per second behind the GTX 980, and only a minor improvement over the GTX 660 (which Nvidia quotes at 144.2GB/s). Such a tiny bump is surprising; the GTX 660 was released almost three years ago and the memory demands of games have increased since then.

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

Nvidia has tossed in hardware encode and decode support for H.265 alongside HDCP 2.2 compatibility over HDMI 2.0. This is an important advancement for anyone interested in home theater, as it means a PC with the GTX 960 will be ready to handle current and upcoming 4K content and output it to an HDTV.

And then there’s the green team’s usual suite of software utilities, which includes GeForce Experience for driver updates, ShadowPlay for gaming recording and G-Sync for a stutter-free experience on compatible monitors. There’s also Dynamic Super Resolution, a new feature introduced with the 900 series that can improve the quality of older titles by rendering at a very high resolution and then down-scaling the result with a special filter. DirectX 12 support is included, too.

Big Boy

A typical GTX 960 occupies two slots, like almost every modern PCI Express video card, and measures about nine and a half inches long. The EVGA card we reviewed, which has a custom cooler, is 10 inches. The size of the reference card is identical to the GTX 760, which itself was identical to the GTX 660.

Memory bandwidth is barely more than a stock GTX 660, which is several years old.

Only a single PCI Express power connector is needed to power the GTX 960, as with previous cards in the family, and Nvidia’s specifications call for a surprisingly small 400-watt power supply. The out-going GTX 760 called for a 500-watt supply and the GTX 660 called for a 450-watt unit.

Nvidia boasted during its presentation that the GTX 960 can run League of Legends at 1080p while consuming only 30 watts, and under that workload the card can be passively cooled. That’s pretty good, but it’s apparently not enough for OEMs, which are as usual putting together their own designs.

EVGA’s custom cooling solution, which the company calls ACX 2.0, helps the card maintain silent, fanless operation whenever the GPU’s temperature is below 60 degrees Celsius through the use of a large cooling plate that covers the memory. The company also uses a double ball-bearing fan design to prolong life and improve efficiency when the fans are active. The card is not overclocked from the factory, but owners can use EVGA’s PrecisionX software to turn it up to 11.

The performance of silence

We put the cooler to the test and found it delivers a quiet experience. At idle the fans remain off, which of course means the GTX 960 adds no noise to the system. Full load forced the fans on, of course, but even then we measured no more than 38.9 decibels of noise. That’s slightly less than the GTX 980, which was already among the quietest cards we’ve ever reviewed.

To see how the claims of passively cooled gaming stacked up, we turned to Unigine’s Valley benchmark, which we ran at a variety of settings between 720p and 1080p resolution. We also limited the frame rate to 60 FPS. The card was unable to run a full test loop without turning on its fans. While some aging 3D games may play passively, that’s not how the card works with most titles.

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

We measured power draw of 52 watts at idle, which rose to as much as 228 watts at load. Both figures are not as far off the GTX 980 as you might expect. When we tested that card in the same rig (a Falcon Northwest Talon) we measured idle draw of 58 watts and load draw of up to 250 watts. On the other hand, though, the 960 needs 20 watts less at idle than AMD’s much slower Radeon R7 250X.

Game performance

Now we know where Nvidia intends the GTX 960 to compete, but talk isn’t worth much. Here’s how this new mid-range hardware stacked up in modern titles.

3DMark

Futuremark’s 3DMark is the industry standard among synthetic benchmark tests. It provides a solid, well-rounded look at performance across a variety of loops designed to simulate different workloads, from games so basic they can run on tablets to the most demanding 3D titles. We focus on Cloud Gate and Fire Strike, which simulate modest and extremely intense titles, respectively.

The performance picture here is clear. Nvidia’s GTX 970 trails the flagship 980 by about 20 percent, and the 960 is about 40 percent slower.

That’s a big disadvantage, but it’s not unexpected given the price difference between these cards. A GTX 980 will typically set you back $550, but the 960’s MSRP is just $200. Based on 3DMark alone we’d have to say the GTX 960 is a solid value.

Now what about real-world gaming?

Diablo 3

We started in Diablo 3, a graphically simple game most modern hardware can handle with ease. The GTX 960 is no exception, blazing an impressive path at 1080p. It hit an average of 176 frames per second even at very high detail.

Players with a 1080p monitor will have no complaint, but 4K gaming is rarely smooth.

Such excellent performance is bound to tempt gamers into buying a 4K monitor, and that wouldn’t be a mistake – if this is the only game you enjoy. We measured an average frame rate of exactly 60 FPS with all details at maximum, and the minimum dipped no lower than 49 FPS.

Civilization Beyond Earth

The latest title from strategy developer Firaxis isn’t exactly a looker, but it can be surprisingly demanding. We ran the baked-in benchmark, which simulates a busy end-game situation, and found the GTX 960 managed 70 frames per second at maximum detail and 1080p resolution. The minimum, once again, is a modest 49 FPS.

4K hammered the 960, however, as it hit an average of just 44 FPS even at medium detail with 2x MSAA turned on. Switching to maximum detail slowed the game to a crawl, and we saw an average of just 28 FPS. That’s playable because of the game’s slow pace, but it’s certainly not ideal.

Battlefield 4

DICE’s standout first-person shooter is no longer at the cutting edge of graphics, but it can still be tough for mid-range hardware to run with every bit of eye candy turned on. The GTX 960 once again delivered a good-enough performance, though, hitting 60 FPS at 1080p and Ultra detail. The minimum framerate was 52 FPS.

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

That, of course, doesn’t leave much leftover grunt of 4K. We measured a playable average of 45 FPS at medium detail, which sunk to an unplayable 17 FPS average at ultra. Clearly, the GTX 960 can’t handle much beyond 1080p in this title.

Shadows of Mordor

This cross-platform game was the surprise treat of 2014, but it’s also extremely hard on hardware, and the GTX 960 isn’t entirely up to the task. While the title averaged 86 frames per second at medium detail, that was cut back to a mere 38 at ultra. Worse, the minimum frame rate came in at 16, which means gameplay can be frustrating at times.4K? Forget about it. At medium the average was a barely playable 29 FPS. Ultra cut that number down to just 15 FPS, with a minimum of nine. Clearly, this game is too much for the GTX 960 when played at UltraHD resolution.

Crysis 3

Now it’s time for the ultimate test, Crysis 3. While the game is getting on in years it remains one of the most demanding titles available, a reputation it reaffirmed during our benchmarks. Even 1080p and medium detail turned in an average of 57 FPS, and very high reduced that to a stutter-stop 16 FPS. Ouch!

Bill Roberson/Digital Trends

As for 4K, well, you can imagine how it went down. At medium the game hit an average of 24 FPS, which is almost playable, but very high detail was hopeless. The game continually crashed whenever we switched textures to this setting.

Conclusion

Nvidia’s review guide was careful focus on 1080p gaming, and it’s easy to see why. At full HD the card performs well, hitting an average of 60 FPS in most games even with detail set to maximum. Only Crysis 3 proved a real challenge, reporting an average of 57 FPS at medium presets. Up the resolution to 1440p or 4K, however, and there may be problems.

With that said, the GTX 960 does provide a strong boost over the outgoing GTX 760. In 3DMark’s Fire Strike loop, for example, it scores 6,675, over 1,000 better than the 760’s result of 5,393. The GTX 760 also debuted at $250, but the reference 960 is only $200 (and our EVGA review unit is $210). Nvidia’s mid-range entry remains a solid value.

Gamers with a 1080p monitor will find a lot to like. The new GTX 960 is about 20 percent quicker than the outgoing GTX 760, and it provides that boost alongside passive idle operation, minimal noise at load and a more affordable price. This is what most gamers will, and should, buy. Just don’t expect it to handle anything you throw at it.

Highs

  • Silent at idle
  • Low power draw
  • Can easily handle most games at 1080p
  • Good value

Lows

  • Modest memory bandwidth
  • 1440p and 4K can prove too much

www.digitaltrends.com

GeForce GTX 960

older Released January, 2015

9.2 Out of 10 GPUBoss Score

Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II OC 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+ 1.3 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 G1 Gaming 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 AMP! Edition 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II OC 1.3 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 WindForce 2X OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 FTW ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 WindForce 2X OC 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming 1.2 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 G1 Gaming 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 OC 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 Performance Edition 1.1 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 1.2 GHz 2 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 Gamer OC Mini Black 1.2 GHz 4 GBGainward GeForce GTX 960 Phantom 4 GB 1.1 GHz 4 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming 100ME 1.2 GHz 2 GBPalit GeForce GTX 960 JetStream 4 GB 1.1 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 SC ACX 2.0 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 SC ACX 2.0 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 WindForce 2X 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 Performance Edition 4 GB 1.1 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 AMP! Edition 1.3 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 XTREME Gaming 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBPalit GeForce GTX 960 JetStream 1.2 GHz 2 GBInno3D GeForce GTX 960 HerculeZ 2X OC 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 FTW ACX 2.0+ 1.3 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 ACX 2.0 4 GB 1.1 GHz 4 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 EXOC 1.2 GHz 2 GBGainward GeForce GTX 960 Phantom GLH 1.3 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.1 GHz 4 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 Mini OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBPalit GeForce GTX 960 Super JetStream 1.3 GHz 2 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 EXOC White 1.3 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 OCV1 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 IX OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBNvidia GeForce GTX 960 OEM 924 MHz 3 GBKFA2 GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II OC SP 1.3 GHz 2 GBInno3D GeForce GTX 960 HerculeZ X3 Air Boss Ultra 1.3 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming LE 100ME 1.2 GHz 2 GBGainward GeForce GTX 960 Phantom 1.2 GHz 2 GBColorful GeForce GTX 960 BURI-Mini 1.2 GHz 2 GBGainward GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 WindForce 2X 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 Extreme TOP 1.3 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 XTREME Gaming 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 1.2 GHz 2 GBKFA2 GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBELSA GeForce GTX 960 S.A.C SS 1.1 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 SuperSC ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 FTW ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.3 GHz 4 GBColorful GeForce GTX 960 Flame Wars X 1.2 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming LE 1.2 GHz 2 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBKFA2 GeForce GTX 960 EXOC 1.2 GHz 2 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 SOC 1.2 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 OC Gaming 4 GB 1.2 GHz 4 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 ACX 2.0+ 4 GB 1.1 GHz 4 GBPalit GeForce GTX 960 1.2 GHz 2 GBGIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 WindForce 2X CN 1.1 GHz 2 GBGALAX GeForce GTX 960 OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II Black OC 1.3 GHz 2 GBEVGA GeForce GTX 960 ACX 2.0+ 1.1 GHz 2 GBBIOSTAR GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBInno3D GeForce GTX 960 HerculeZ 2X OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II Black 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 Extreme OC 1.3 GHz 2 GBMSI GeForce GTX 960 Gaming MGSV 1.2 GHz 2 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 OC Gaming 1.2 GHz 2 GBPoint of View GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU III OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBLeadtek GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBColorful GeForce GTX 960 Flame Wars U 1.2 GHz 2 GBASUS GeForce GTX 960 DirectCU II OC 1.2 GHz 2 GBInno3D GeForce GTX 960 HerculeZ 1X 1.1 GHz 2 GBLeadtek GeForce GTX 960 Hurricane 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 1.1 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 AMP! Edition 1.3 GHz 2 GBELSA GeForce GTX 960 S.A.C 1.2 GHz 2 GBZOTAC GeForce GTX 960 Galactic Edition 1.2 GHz 2 GBPoint of View GeForce GTX 960 AMMO 1.2 GHz 2 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 OC2 1.3 GHz 2 GBPNY GeForce GTX 960 Elite OC 1.3 GHz 2 GB Explore 32 desktops with the GeForce GTX 960
Gigabyte has crammed three DisplayPorts, two DVI ports, and an HDMI port onto their board, which is more than anyone else. by techPowerUp! In this article, we are reviewing the Palit GTX 960 Super JetStream, which is the highest clocked GTX 960 that we are reviewing today. by techPowerUp!

GPUBoss Review Our evaluation of the GeForce GTX 960 among Desktop GPUs for under $200

Benchmarks Real world tests of the GeForce GTX 960

GeForce GTX 960

111.95 mHash/s

GeForce GTX 960

69.13 mPixels/s

GeForce GTX 960

780.9 frames/s

Reviews Word on the street for the GeForce GTX 960

9.0

Using an automatic TMDS switch chip on the board, you may run 2x DVI, 1x DP and 1x HDMI or 3x DP, 1x DVI and 1x HDMI at the same time.

What People Are Saying Give it to me straight

Performance

Since most NVIDIA add-in card (AIC) partners don't have reference-design cards, we simply picked two of the best cards we have with us, lowered their clocks to match NVIDIA reference specs, and put them through our test-bench. by techPowerUp! With such high clocks, the GTX 960 G1 Gaming achieves an 8% performance increase over reference, which is bigger than any other GTX 960 we tested so far. by techPowerUp! I like Gigabyte's move to increase Boost clocks so much, as it provides extra performance that most other GTX 960 cards won't reach. by techPowerUp!

Applications

All by itself, the GTX 960 SLI is a cracker of a combination, and we see performance upscale in excess of 80 percent in games that take advantage of SLI, at 1080p and 1440p resolutions. by techPowerUp! GPU Temperature ComparisonIdleLoadGigabyte GTX 960 OC32°C65°CGigabyte GTX 960 G1 Gaming38°C67°CMSI GTX 960 Gaming45°C63°CASUS GTX 960 STRIX42°C60°CEVGA GTX 960 SSC40°C71°CPalit GTX 960 Super Jetstream35°C67°C Important: GPU temperature will vary depending on clock speed, voltage settings, cooler design, and production variances. by techPowerUp! While the game doesn't introduce any revolutionary new concepts, it's welcome new food for lovers of the genre. by techPowerUp!

Power

NVIDIA has clearly transferred some of the cost-savings from a smaller chip with lower power-draw translating into a cheaper VRM, fewer memory chips, and a lighter cooler, over to the consumers. by techPowerUp! NVIDIA has clearly transferred some of the cost-savings due to a smaller chip with lower power-draw, which translates into a cheaper VRM, fewer memory chips, and a lighter cooler, to the consumers. by techPowerUp! This configuration is specified for up to 225 W power draw. by techPowerUp!

Gaming

Since the GTX 960 is targeted at Full HD gaming, 2 GB shouldn't let you down with any of today's games. by techPowerUp! Second, those who want to convert their vanilla desktops to gaming PCs, and game on their Full HD TVs. by techPowerUp! Second are those who want to convert their vanilla desktops into gaming PCs to game on their Full HD TVs. by techPowerUp!

Memory

With NVIDIA's memory bandwidth management sauce added to the mix, the company is talking about an unscientific "effective bandwidth" figure of around 144 GB/s.. by techPowerUp! Don't be quick to write off the 128-bit memory bus width just yet, because NVIDIA is backing it with a new lossless texture compression technology that reduces memory bandwidth usage, effectively making it a wider memory bus than it physically is. by techPowerUp! Don't be quick to write off the 128-bit memory bus width just yet as NVIDIA is backing it with a new lossless texture compression technology that reduces memory bandwidth usage, effectively making it a wider memory bus than it physically is. by techPowerUp!

Specifications Full list of technical specs

gpu

GPU brand GPU name Market Clock speed Turbo clock speed Is dual GPU Reference card
Nvidia
GM206
Desktop
1,127 MHz
1,178 MHz
No
None

raw performance

Shading units Texture mapping units Render output processors Pixel rate Texture rate Floating-point performance
1,024
64
32
36.1 GPixel/s
72.1 GTexel/s
2,308.1 GFLOPS

memory

Memory clock speed Effective memory clock speed Memory bus Memory Memory type Memory bandwidth
1,753 MHz
7,012 MHz
128 bit
2,048 MB
GDDR5
112.2 GB/s
Submit

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 Review

What is the Nvidia GeForce GTX 960?

The second generation of Nvidia’s Maxwell hardware arrived with the high-end GTX 980 and GTX 970 cards back in September, but it’s taken until now for mainstream parts to arrive. That’s where the GTX 960 comes in; it’s designed for 1080p gaming, and its £160 price is far more palatable than its high-end stablemates.

This card also has plenty of competition. AMD has a pair of mid-range parts that have been made more tempting because of recent price drops. There’s the Radeon R9 285, which is ten pounds cheaper than Nvidia’s latest card, and the R9 280X that now starts at £175.

SEE ALSO: The Best FPS Games

Nvidia GeForce GTX 960: Under the Hood

Maxwell is all about achieving better performance while cutting power consumption. Nvidia has done this by rearranging its stream processors – the parts that do the heavy lifting inside a GPU core.

Nvidia has long arranged these processors into blocks called streaming multiprocessors, which are then crammed inside larger structures called Graphics Processing Clusters (GPCs). Cards from Nvidia’s previous generation had 192 stream processors inside each multiprocessor, but that figure has now been cut down to 128. Each multiprocessor now has its own scheduling hardware, and the new card has double the number of geometry units when compared to last-generation GPUs.

There are four of those smaller multiprocessors inside each GPC, which allows Nvidia to delegate tasks with more precision – and, therefore, operate more frugally. It’s an improvement over the “brute force” approach used on older cards, like the GTX 760, which had two larger multiprocessors per GPC. Maxwell’s revised GPCs don’t need as much resource-sharing hardware, either, which further cuts down power draw.

Maxwell’s more precise approach means fewer stream processors are used overall. The GTX 960 has 1,024 divided across two Graphics Processing Clusters, which is down on the 1,152 installed inside the older GTX 760. That’s allowed clock speeds to increase: the GTX 960’s core runs at 1,127MHz with a maximum boost speed of 1,228MHz. The GTX 760, by contrast, was limited to 980MHz and 1,124MHz.

Nvidia’s changes result in a peak processing level of 2,308 GFLOPs. That’s a minor improvement on the 2,257 GFLOPs of the GTX 760 but it does of course come with those power saving benefits. It is, however, further below its AMD rivals, both of which offer at least 3,290 GFLOPs.

The GTX 960’s memory configuration isn’t all that impressive. Its 2GB of GDDR5 is accessed using a 128-bit wide bus, which falls behind AMD’s cards – the 280X used a 384-bit interface, while the R9 285 relies on 256-bit hardware. Nvidia’s memory is clocked to 1,753MHz, but we’re not convinced that this higher speed will make up the deficit. The GTX 960’s memory bandwidth sits at 224GB/s, which is higher than the R9 285 but lower than the R9 280X.

Evidence of Maxwell’s increased efficiency can be seen at the back of every card. The GTX 960 requires just one six-pin power connector, which compares well to AMD’s hardware – the R9 285 needs two six-pin connectors, and the R9 280X needs a six- and eight-pin plug.

How We Tested

We’ve locked and loaded five games for this GPU test. Battlefield 4, Bioshock Infinite and Crysis 3 all return from our previous reviews, and we’ve added Metro: Last Light and Batman: Arkham Origins to the mix. We’ve tested at 1,920 x 1,080, 2,560 x 1,440 and even 3,840 x 2,160 to see which card is best across single-screens – and to check if any of them can handle 4K.

We’ve used 3D Mark’s Fire Strike test and four Unigine Heaven benchmarks to test theoretical performance, and we’ve taken idle and load temperatures and power requirements to see which card is the coolest and most frugal.

Our test rig consists of an Asus X79-Deluxe motherboard, Intel Core i7-4960X processor, 16GB of RAM and a 1TB hard disk.

To get prices for each card we visited www.scan.co.uk and noted down the cheapest stock-speed card we could find, although we will be referring to the various overclocked and tweaked models available for each GPU, which will be more expensive, later on in the review.

ROUND-UP: The Greatest Gaming Laptops

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